Legeaux

The Whaling Brig 'Egregious'

34 posts in this topic

thindexedgif.gif 13b

Ahoy!

It's been a while since I posted here (sorry), but I thought I should share my latest vessel with the community here. I don't recall any Lego whalers to date, but whalers make excellent targets for pirates and cruisers alike. The Egregious uses some new techniques, which you may find useful. Anyway, here's the narration to the brig that I used on LUGNET:

The newest arrival in the waters around Port Brique is the whaling brig Egregious. Whalers have tended to operate further south, but Port Brique was a resupply stop for Captain Warning in his hunt for a peculiarly coloured great whale.

ten01.jpg

The story has it that young Neville C. Warning Junior, then only a mate aboard his father's whaler Tendentious, lost his leg to a huge red hued southern right whale the notorious Moby Dique, the legendary Rouge Whale in the waters near Port Brique over twenty years ago.

Despite the loss of his leg, young Neville has now achieved his own command, and, going by his middle name to avoid confusion with his father, Captain N. Civility Warning, returned to the South Pacifique, determined to kill the great Rouge Whale.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten02.jpg

Despite being a small whaler by any standard, the Egregious is a fast and handy vessel, carries a skilled, if somewhat eclectic crew.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten03.jpg

The Egregious is built on a four centre section hull, and includes the challenging construction combination of short ratlines and Vikings masts. I have gained a newfound appreciation of the possibilities of the short ratlines. I had previously written them off as next to useless for serious vessel construction and even after I used them on the cutter Tresfroid and the hermaphrodite brig Ratsee, I doubted that they could be used successfully on a wide hulled vessel. They support the 2x2 columns that form the masts nicely, and secure the tops which provide a stable base for the Vikings masts.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten04.jpg

I know the stability of the Vikings masts has been questioned, particularly in that they have only a 4x2 footprint, compared to the 4x4 footprint of traditional pirates masts. My technique to secure the masts uses a 4x2 'socket' in the top only one plate deep, but that seems to be enough to keep things sufficiently rigid.

Attaching yards, gaffs and booms to the Viking masts is, I think, more difficult than with the old style masts, and some of the solutions I used are fairly inelegant. This is my first vessel to include crow's nest style lookouts. Which are reasonably authentic in that masthead lookouts are very important for whalers, but seem a bit heavy compared to the masts.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten05.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten06pg

I'm particularly pleased with the colour scheme of the Egregious. I didn't originally intend to have quite so much tan (in fact using tan was only a chance thought as I was looking through my box of inverted slopes, and I realized I had the necessary 32 inverted 2x2 slopes in tan), but as I built it up, I became more and more enamored with it. The black/tan/brown scheme also dictated that it would be brown rowboats sacrificed to make the whaleboats, rather than red ones although I guess it's not as if I have a particular shortage of either colour!

The bowsprit and jibboom are the second try on the Egregious. I originally used a bowsprit SNOTed from plates and 1x1x5 bricks, in tan. It looked a lot like a microfig skyscraper mid collapse, but was, at least, the right colour. A third Viking mast (if I had one), wouldn't have been effective because of the 4x4 top, and the Viking topmast section alone wouldn't have been long enough. A near ideal solution might be a tan topmast section, with a column of 2x2 rounds making up the base, but even that wouldn't produce the bowsprit-jibboom look. So in the end, I went with the tried and tested traditional pirates mast sections for the bowsprit and jibboom. It would be perfect if it were in tan, but alas.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten07.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten08.jpg

As alluded to above, the whaleboats are cut down rowboats, in the manner pioneered by Richard Parsons of Port Block fame. I made a jig out of expendable (old grey) bricks secured 3 studs forward of the stern, and carefully cut through with a fine toothed saw. On the first couple I needed to use a craft knife & sandpaper to trim and tidy, but the last two by which time I'd figured out it was better to cut from the bottom up rather than the top down a light sand was all that was needed to get them ready for joining. I could have made the whaleboats a little longer, but I was going for the look of a whaleboat, rather than length particularly.

The sails are once again parchment type paper. I've now been using this paper for a while, and can report favourably on its durability as well. Not only is it easier to work with than stiffened fabric, it is much more durable and doesn't sag over time (particularly an issue with jibs and staysails). It's also very cheap. I know that many people don't care for the look, and I even tried using standard Lego sails but they just weren't large enough. A bonus of using short ratlines alone is that it allows the arms to be properly angled for beating. I particularly like the look of a big square rigger pointing up into the wind.

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten09.jpg

More pics:

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten11.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten12.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten13.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten14.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten15.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten16.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten17.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten18.jpg

http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/rdulin/Egregious/ten19.jpg

As always, any comments, suggestions or feedback would be most welcome.

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i waswondering why there is an islander [in] your whaler...

He's part of the "skilled, if somewhat eclectic crew". :-|

(Whaler crews, like those of many age-of-sail crews, were of mixed race. Islanders, well practiced in spear throwing, were often favoured as harpooners).

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maybe you should change the body thought to actual clothes..... after all he appears to be paritally nude....

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ten08.jpg X-O .

You sawed it in half, nonetheless it looks nice and a intelligent way to put it on! Nice whaling ship by the way. Great use of those new masts too. I thought at first that you used the new ship hulls as well, I guess I was wrong X-D . Great MOC. Making an islander put on clothes might make them upset, cause it's their "tradition" to wear what they have. So, we wouldn't be wanting to upset the islander now would we :-D .

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OH, IF HE GETS ANGRY THERE ARE PLENTY IMPERIAL SHIPS TO KEEP HIM IN LINE......

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ten08.jpg_thumb.jpg X-O .

You sawed it in half, nonetheless it looks nice and a intelligent way to put it on!

I think there is a definite need for a variety of ships boats, and a brick built boat doesn't properly convey the fragility of a whaleboat. (Not to mention would be too big to sling on the Egregious's davits!)

Nice whaling [brig] by the way. Great use of those new masts too. I thought at first that you used the new ship hulls as well, I guess I was wrong X-D .

Thanks! You are actually partly right... the centre sections are from the viking longship. Unfortunately, I haven't come up with a way to use the viking bow/stern sections for an age-of-sail-vessel - the timber work is just too different, I think.

Great MOC. Making an islander put on clothes might make them upset, cause it's their "tradition" to wear what they have. So, we wouldn't be wanting to upset the islander now would we :-D .

Certainly not when he's the best harpooner aboard!

(Actually, the trick would probably to be to sail far enough south. He's going to want to put some clothes on sooner or later ;-) )

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Wow, that's one of the best MOC ships I have seen for a long time!

If this was a real Lego set, I would immediatly go buy it.

The colors are great, the sails look very good.

The whaleboats are very original (I hadn't seen this been done before).

While reading about how you made this ship, I decided to put a viking longboat on my x-mas list (I still had to suggest a gift to my mother :-)).

The overall look of the ship is just perfect!

Mr. Phes, Isn't this something for the eurobricks headlines?

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ten01.jpg

I like how you've used the tan pieces for this MOC because they work well with the brown.

Though perhaps its a little overwhelming in the closeups:

ten02.jpg

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Wow, that's one of the best MOC ships I have seen for a long time!

If this was a real Lego set, I would immediatly go buy it.

Wow, thanks! That's quite a complement.

The Egregious is probably the closest any of my sailing vessels come to being 'doable' by Lego. The piece count is quite low for the size of the vessel and the whole thing (bar the bowsprit connection) is very solid.

The colors are great, the sails look very good.

The whaleboats are very original (I hadn't seen this been done before).

I give full credit to Richard Parsons for being the first person to actually do the whaleboat conversion... unfortunately, his whaleboats never got the publicity they deserved - I had the good fortune to see them in the flesh back in June 2003.

While reading about how you made this ship, I decided to put a viking longboat on my x-mas list (I still had to suggest a gift to my mother :-)).

I reckon the viking longship is a great set (and a pair even better! ;-)) there are some really excellent parts for the keen pirate builder.

The overall look of the ship is just perfect!

Thanks again!

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ten01.jpg

I like how you've used the tan pieces for this MOC because they work well with the brown.

Yes. I was quite surprised how well they worked together (I think the black helps quite a bit too).

Though perhaps its a little overwhelming in the closeups:

ten02.jpg_thumb.jpg

Yes. I think the main problem is the deck colour. Grey (old light grey), always my first choice, didn't work well, white was too bright and brown (old) looked worse than the tan, so I went with tan.

Looking at it again, new light grey might be an option (though none of the greys seem to work well with tan), or, perhaps surprisingly, black (though that would be terribly unrealistic!)

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So before I continue on I must ask if you intend to continue work on this MOC or is the program finished for good?

If its still ongoing then it would be interesting to see what the deck looks like using a different colour.

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What a beautiful ship this is! Very original and smart design. 8-o *y*

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I like it! I see you used reddish brown hull pieces, I wouldn't notice if I didn't see a close up!

There lots of details on the top deck, I like that! And this part also looks great! I love the use of SNOT.

The only thing I don't really like is the part on the left in this picture being so long, a window could do the job I think..

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Nice MOC. I've never thought of using paper to make may sails. Hmm I might have to try it. I think the sails look pretty good.

The only thing i don't like is that the masts don't seem held up very well by those shorter rope pieces. Otherwise it looks great.

I like the way the little long-boats are made. I personally would never want to cut up my lego bricks. But your design is much more realistic and sturdy than building a brick whaling-boat.

I wonder if plates and click hinges would work.

I really like the idea of using a totally different vessel than the standard military and pirate ship!

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By the way...

save_the_whales.jpg

HAHAHAHAHHAHAHA Yes you're right :-D

But there were more whales those days so no need to worry....yet....

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Certainly not when he's the best harpooner aboard!

(Actually, the trick would probably to be to sail far enough south. He's going to want to put some clothes on sooner or later ;-) )

Well, then he'd freeze to death!!

The only thing I don't really like is the part on the left in this picture being so long, a window could do the job I think..

Actually, I like ithe back part, specially how it sloops downward.

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So before I continue on I must ask if you intend to continue work on this MOC or is the program finished for good?

If its still ongoing then it would be interesting to see what the deck looks like using a different colour.

Good question. I can give you the answer of 'possibly'. There are two factors:

Firstly, I have a reasonable number of sailing vessels under sail or ready for sail, and I tend to periodically rebuild or upgrade them. I have a couple of things planned at the moment, and the Egregious is built in my latest style (along with Seatop, Bloviator, Rats

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Nice MOC. I've never thought of using paper to make may sails. Hmm I might have to try it. I think the sails look pretty good.

I much recommend it. Real Lego fabric sails would be better (if they came in larger sizes! ;-)), but paper sails are, I think, far better than bare spars.

The only thing i don't like is that the masts don't seem held up very well by those shorter rope pieces. Otherwise it looks great.

From a construction point of vew, they are well supported. From a 'look' point of view, I can understand your concern, however, adding tall ratlines too the topmasts looks too heavy (thought the newer design does look better than the older, tapered design in this context). I think it looks better without topmast ratlines, although possibly some Lego string shrouds and backstays instead would look good.

I like the way the little long-boats are made. I personally would never want to cut up my lego bricks. But your design is much more realistic and sturdy than building a brick whaling-boat.

I wonder if plates and click hinges would work.

Cutting is always going to be an emotional issue. ;-) I'll just say that I have enough rowboats for it not to be a concern. I've cut some other pieces too (including wide hull pieces :-O), but only after I've properly considered what is lost by so doing.

I've done some reasonable boats using six wide bow pieces and SNOT sides, quite sturdy and realistic, but too heavy for a proper whaleboat. I'd be interested in what you have in mind with plates and click hinges.

I really like the idea of using a totally different vessel than the standard military and pirate ship!

It makes a change. And there's a lot of scope of different detail (lots of harpoons, for instance ;-)). I'd recommend building an unarmed vessel - it makes a change not to have to build gunports in.

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Cutting is always going to be an emotional issue. ;-) I'll just say that I have enough rowboats for it not to be a concern. I've cut some other pieces too (including wide hull pieces :-O), but only after I've properly considered what is lost by so doing.

I've done some reasonable boats using six wide bow pieces and SNOT sides, quite sturdy and realistic, but too heavy for a proper whaleboat. I'd be interested in what you have in mind with plates and click hinges.

It makes a change. And there's a lot of scope of different detail (lots of harpoons, for instance ;-)). I'd recommend building an unarmed vessel - it makes a change not to have to build gunports in.

MIND THE COLORS PLEASE, I JUST THREW THIS THING TOGETHER

roughlongboat.jpg

roughlongboat2.jpg

along these lines is what i was talking about. i still like your design much better.

i've only got certain sizes in flex hoses and most of my color appropriate click hings are already being used in my frigate. I'll probably keep it built until i come up with a better bow design. Cause i'd like to have my own longboats for my frigate maybe.

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That's an interesting way to make a boat hull Mr Phred, shame about the gaps though...

roughlongboat.jpg

Is there an easy way of concealing those?

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That's an interesting way to make a boat hull Mr Phred, shame about the gaps though...

roughlongboat.jpg

Is there an easy way of concealing those?

the gap along the side is pretty much only visable at that specific angle. also the gap lessens when the side plates are pressed in all the way. from the top view, you can't even see a gap on the side. the bow on the other hand has a few smaller gaps and two gaps one plate thick. i dunno how to fix that yet.

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roughlongboat2.jpg

Not a bad idea Mr. Phred, but I prefer cutting some boats in 2 like Legeaux did X-D .

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