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Frank STENGEL

Unbending Tracks

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I recently bought a small bunch of RC/PF tracks during a garage sale. They were cheap, really cheap. The thing is the points are bent: when on a flat surface, the ends stick out by 0.5-1cm. It seems they were stored in a hot garage attic...

Has anyone an idea on flattening the thingies? I mean anything quicker than: "put it under a few dozen pounds of books and wait for a (very long) while" would be welcome.

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You could try heat. I think Lego starts to soften 200F-300F, but this, I found, might contradict that:

  • ABS maximum temperature is 80C (176F) and melt at 105C (221F)
  • Polycarbonate plastic used for transparent bricks melt at 267C (512.6F)

Still if you use your oven and start the heat a it's minimum (mine is as low as 170F) and raise it slowly you should be fine. Definitely try a practice run first

default_classic.gif

Edited by Lego Guy Bri

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try a hair dryer and then put a heavy book on top to hold it flat. I once had a LEGO hotrod style exhaust pipe that was bent, i heated it with a candle and it got very soft very quick. A hair dryer on hi should work fine. I use that method to soften the leather on work boots to speed the breaking in process.

Sal

WFB, WI

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Still if you use your oven and start the heat a it's minimum (mine is as low as 170F) and raise it slowly you should be fine. Definitely try a practice run first

default_classic.gif

Tried that out. I heated the point to about 100C (212F) for 5-10 minutes until it started flattening. Took it out and let it cool under some weight. And voilà, a nice flat point...

Thanks.

Edited by Frank STENGEL

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Tried that out. I heated the point to about 100C (212F) for 5-10 minutes until it started flattening. Took it out and let it cool under some weight. And voilà, a nice flat point...

Thanks.

Glad it worked out for you! And thanks for the info on heating, I have a few elements that need it default_classic.gif

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Glad it worked out for you! And thanks for the info on heating, I have a few elements that need it default_classic.gif

Just one thing: keep a constant eye on the parts. You want to be able to take them out of the oven before they are overcooked :wink: I had a chair in front of the oven which had my wife wondering what paint I was watching dry *huh*

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Just one thing: keep a constant eye on the parts. You want to be able to take them out of the oven before they are overcooked I had a chair in front of the oven which had my wife wondering what paint I was watching dry

Good to know. About how long did you have in?

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Good to know. About how long did you have in?

I don't remember: 5 to 10 minutes...

Edited by Frank STENGEL

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I had a chair in front of the oven which had my wife wondering what paint I was watching dry *huh*

:laugh: Mom, I'm bakin' some LOLs. I need to make shure it's just right. haha. :laugh:

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Boiling some water in the microwave and then putting the pieces in the boiling water is a mostly safe way. Water boils at 212 degrees F.

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Boiling some water in the microwave and then putting the pieces in the boiling water is a mostly safe way. Water boils at 212 degrees F.

Actually, I tried this. It did not work: the water cooled too fast for it to properly heat the rather large parts.

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Actually, I tried this. It did not work: the water cooled too fast for it to properly heat the rather large parts.

You could try a double boiler method on the stove top too.. a bit of a PIA though.

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You could try a double boiler method on the stove top too.. a bit of a PIA though.

Yep, a Pain In Anterior would be the result if you stood too close to the stove too long.

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Beware! Check the temperature of your oven and stay there to be able to act quick!

As previously stated ABS starts melting at about 105 °C. I just made the bitter default_sing.gif experience. I had wanted to go faster and heated the oven to 110 °C. Result : a totally shrunk piece of plastic ready for the bin (or to be used for modding !)

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Ups, this sounds like Dali's tracks:

salvador-dali-clock-melting-clocks-78104.jpg

You should call those track an art and sell them for a lot of money:-)

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Ups, this sounds like Dali's tracks:

salvador-dali-clock-melting-clocks-78104.jpg

You should call those track an art and sell them for a lot of money:-)

Weird, my wife said exactly the same! default_laugh_new.gif

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