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NiceMarmot

The Myth of Tiafra & Garnafuxo

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Well, I'm way too late for the Kaliphlin myth challenge, and I've only got one of the vignettes built, but here it is. This is an old myth in the south central Kaliphlin. It explains where the Muk River comes from, as well as why the ground is so good for red wine grapes, and why there are so many lightning storms in the mountains.

The Myth of Tiafra and Garnafuxo

Long, long ago, when the southern Siccus was dry, empty, and flat, there lived a very beautiful princess named Tiafra. Not only was she beautiful, she was gracious, innocent, and sweet. It was said that she was as beautiful as the dawn, as sweet as honey, and as innocent as newly fallen snow. However, she was also sensitive, and somewhat emotional and impulsive. She had been raised to control her emotions, and not succumb to her impulses.

Her beauty and pleasant nature did not go unnoticed; she had many suitors, and as was her way, charmingly kept them all at arm's length. However, such beauty and charm is not just attractive to earthly creatures; she was soon noticed by Garnafuxo, god of lightning and trickery. Hargzild, spirit of the earth, also desired her, but he is too shy to pursue her. Garnafuxo however, who is quite hideous to human eyes but can be charming if he applies himself, is quite lustful, and decided that he must have the beautiful Princess Tiafra. And once he decides on something, he never gives up on it.

Garnafuxo, knowing that he is hideous to humans, changed his appearance to that of a handsome prince, and appeared to Tiafra. Introducing himself to her, he used all his charms and wiles to try to seduce her. She graciously and charmingly resisted him. At first, Garnafuxo was encouraged by her charming responses to him. He feted her with wondrous banquets and took her on moonlight cruises on the bay. However, he soon realized that he was making no progress with her. He pulled out all the stops, and took her to the shrine of Al-Garbez, on top of Mt Bundar, where the view of the city, bay, and mountains is said to be one of the most beautiful in Siccus. In this setting, he poured on the charm, giving her gifts, flattering her, flattering her friends and family, using magical tricks to impress her, all to no avail. Her refusal was steadfast.

Garnafuxo unsuccessfully woos Tiafra at the shrine of Al-Garbez

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Myth of Tiafra & Garnafuxo: Garnafuxo woos Tiafra

Garnafuxo was enraged. He had never been refused like this before. His resolve hardened; he would have her no matter what it took. And clearly, what it would take was his specialty: trickery. In his lair, he changed back into his natural appearance and then went back to the world. He seized the Princess Tiafra (who did not recognize him), took her to a desolate area, and imprisoned her on a rock floating above a river of molten lava! He then conjured a vortex of flame of to envelop her and entrap her. Trapped by a hideous monster, surrounded by flame, with the heat rising every minute, the princess was fearful for her life. All seemed lost! Was there any hope? Would anyone help her?

Garnafuxo traps Tiafra in a vortex of flame over lava

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Myth of Tiafra and Garnafuxo, scene 2

More to come...

Edited by NiceMarmot

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I LOVE this vignette. The story is great, and the scene is beautiful, with the moon and star in the background - nice use of perspective. It's too bad this wasn't done it time, as the story seems very original so far... Would love to at least hear the rest of the story. I might post my own myth too, once I complete it.

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This is a beautiful story. The scene is beautiful. I love how you did the reflection's of the moon's?! In the water! The forced perspectives is awesome! I look forward to your future build's. :thumbup: You are going to make more for this story?

Edited by Captain BeerBeard

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NiceMarmot, first try or not, that is fantastic forced perspective! Nice idea on the moonlight reflection, great micro city build, and a very engaging story. Feels like a Greek myth so far, I wonder how it will end...those Greek stories always end badly :tongue:

Great photography too, you really nailed it with the focal length. How deep is this build and how wide is the rearmost plane? I`m guessing something like 18 at the front, 24 deep and 24 wide at the back? Looks superb.

:classic:

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I LOVE this vignette. The story is great, and the scene is beautiful, with the moon and star in the background - nice use of perspective. It's too bad this wasn't done it time, as the story seems very original so far... Would love to at least hear the rest of the story. I might post my own myth too, once I complete it.

Thanks! I'm very happy with it too; I think it's easier to put something compelling together on a smaller scale like this. As for the "moon and star", I'm surprised you didn't recognize the smaller of the two moons on our world :tongue:, but maybe it's so foggy up in Avalonia that you all don't see night sky much?

This is a beautiful story. The scene is beautiful. I love how you did the reflection's of the moon's?! In the water! The forced perspectives is awesome! I look forward to your future build's. :thumbup: You are going to make more for this story?

Thanks for the compliments! This is my first forced perspective, and somehow I think it turned out really well. I'm planning on making about four or five other vignettes for this story. However, I'm a bit worried that they won't rise to this one's level :hmpf_bad:

NiceMarmot, first try or not, that is fantastic forced perspective! Nice idea on the moonlight reflection, great micro city build, and a very engaging story. Feels like a Greek myth so far, I wonder how it will end...those Greek stories always end badly :tongue:

Great photography too, you really nailed it with the focal length. How deep is this build and how wide is the rearmost plane? I`m guessing something like 18 at the front, 24 deep and 24 wide at the back? Looks superb.

:classic:

It's 16 wide at the front and the night sky is 20 wide at the back (basically it's 16 wide all the way back to the night sky. It's 30 studs total front to back - 8 for the foreground, 20 for the microscale, and 2 for the night sky. I originally built the sky as 16 wide also, and then realized it needed to be wider. There's a picture on Flickr that just shows the microscale build. The photography worked out OK, even though it was just a point-and-shoot. As for how it ends... well it's a myth, not a fairy tale...

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Beautiful stuff Gex, just wonderful use of forced perspective. That's a bold use of orange in the foreground, but it works out very well. The shape of the large window is lovely as well. :thumbup: I'm intruiged to see where this myth will go - can't wait until the next installment! :sweet:

ps. That's a lovely border to your image as well!

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I have been meaning to comment on this beautiful MOC. The only part I am not too sure about is the city foreground to the left. I love the way you made the walls??? throughout the city and the moons!:thumbup:

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Nice story ad excellent moc. I really like what you did with the background! :classic:

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Lovely work mate :thumbup:

Fantastic forced perspective build. I've never done it myself but this is definitely an inspiration.

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Great story (so far?) ... and the moc is lovely.

Great window and fantastic forced perspective. The moon light reflection is great :)

Too bad you missed the myth challenge. :(

This would have been great

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I swore that I already commented on this....but obviously not yet! I really like this build and the story to go along with it. The forced perspective of the city in the background looks great. That is a technique that I keep wanting to use, and I just haven't made it work yet. This makes me want to try again!

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Bumping, as I've just posted scene 2 of this myth. See the edited first post. A few more scenes to go after this one.

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The second part is awesome! You were worried about what? It look's so chaotic. I mean that in a good way. :thumbup:

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