legotrainfan

A native speaker of English needed

132 posts in this topic

Hi guys!

What do you say to the following sentences:

The play is about a man at our age.

=> I'd cross out the preposition.

He plays in the club Real Madrid.

=> My suggestion: He plays for club Real Madrid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The play is about a man at our age.

=> I'd cross out the preposition.

The play is about a man our age

or

The play is about a man who is our age

He plays in the club Real Madrid.

=> My suggestion: He plays for club Real Madrid.

He plays for the club Real Madrid

or

He plays for Real Madrid

Cheers

Rog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He plays for the club Real Madrid

or

He plays for Real Madrid

I'd also suggest, "He plays at Real Madrid" or "He plays at the club Real Madrid." Playing for the club implies he plays there under contract, perhaps because he's their primary entertainer. Playing at the club implies that he plays there regularly, but he's not necessarily their headline act or even under contract; he likely plays there part-time or freelance. If he's not the main entertainer at Real Madrid, then "at" is more appropriate. :wink:

Edited by Flipz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a meal on the table. The children ate from the meal.

=> to eat from a meal? Is it OK?

The pharaoh showed his palace.

=> Is it OK without mentioning to whom he showed it? I'd say: He showed THEM (or whomever) his palace.

Was that all only a dream?

=> My version: Was all that only a dream?

Most of them went with sandals or barefoot.

=> in sandals, I assume.

a) They went on holiday/vacation with them.

b) They went with them on holiday/vacation.

=> I'd go with A. What do you think?

A similar example:

a) I went to the cinema with them.

b) I went with them to the cinema.

=> Again, I'd go with A.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a meal on the table. The children ate from the meal.

=> to eat from a meal? Is it OK?

The pharaoh showed his palace.

=> Is it OK without mentioning to whom he showed it? I'd say: He showed THEM (or whomever) his palace.

Was that all only a dream?

=> My version: Was all that only a dream?

Most of them went with sandals or barefoot.

=> in sandals, I assume.

a) They went on holiday/vacation with them.

b) They went with them on holiday/vacation.

=> I'd go with A. What do you think?

A similar example:

a) I went to the cinema with them.

b) I went with them to the cinema.

=> Again, I'd go with A.

1: It should be eat a meal

2: It makes more sense with the word them, as he need to show it to someone.

3: Was that all a dream or was that only a dream

4: Yes 'in' makes more sense

5: Yes go with A

6: Both sound OK, however the second one is a bit more formal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is one of the most used things of teenagers.

=> OK or should it be "by teenagers"?

Another point where this programme is good is when you...

=> Is this sentence OK or should it be for which instead of "where"?

It is maybe the best thing that has ever been invented.

=> I'd put maybe at the beginning. In that position I'd use probably. What do you think?

With the internet you can stay in touch with people everywhere and you are able to find every sort of information.

=> For "every" I'd use any, but I'm not sure if "everywhere" must be substituted with anywhere or whether you can leave it the way it is.

Which one is better?

a) I can do with it what I want.

b) I can do what I want with it.

Thanks in advance for your helpful comments!

Edited by legotrainfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd also suggest, "He plays at Real Madrid" or "He plays at the club Real Madrid." Playing for the club implies he plays there under contract, perhaps because he's their primary entertainer. Playing at the club implies that he plays there regularly, but he's not necessarily their headline act or even under contract; he likely plays there part-time or freelance. If he's not the main entertainer at Real Madrid, then "at" is more appropriate. :wink:

No I don't think this is right. I have never heard anyone in reference to a football club say they play "at" a club. It doesn't sound right. "For" is the right word in this case.

This is one of the most used things of teenagers.

=> OK or should it be "by teenagers"?

Another point where this programme is good is when you...

=> Is this sentence OK or should it be for which instead of "where"?

It is maybe the best thing that has ever been invented.

=> I'd put maybe at the beginning. In that position I'd use probably. What do you think?

Thanks in advance for your helpful comments!

"This is one of the most used things of teenagers. " This is an akward sounding sentence and I can't tell which is right.

"Another point where this programme is good is when you..." "where" is right in this case.

"It is maybe the best thing that has ever been invented." "Maybe" sounds correct in the position it is already. Alternatively you could use "perhaps" which sounds better IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No I don't think this is right. I have never heard anyone in reference to a football club say they play "at" a club. It doesn't sound right. "For" is the right word in this case.

Just what I was about to say!! :thumbup:

This is one of the most used things of teenagers.

=> OK or should it be "by teenagers"?

This is one of the things most used by teenagers.

Another point where this programme is good is when you...

=> Is this sentence OK or should it be for which instead of "where"?

This sentence is fine. "For which" wouldn't sound right.

It is maybe the best thing that has ever been invented.

=> I'd put maybe at the beginning. In that position I'd use probably. What do you think?

Maybe it is the best thing that has ever been invented

OR

It's maybe the best thing that's ever been invented

OR

It's probably the best thing that's ever been invented

These of are all correct but the second are more natural sounding.

However, maybe and probably aren't really interchangeable as the meaning is quite different. "Maybe" is not very likely to happen. "Probably" is very likely to happen.

Cheers

Rog

Edited by rriggs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Lord of Pies! You were so terribly quick that you missed some of my questions since I was editing my post and adding some new information. Maybe you'll have time to share your opinion on the additions too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Lord of Pies! You were so terribly quick that you missed some of my questions since I was editing my post and adding some new information. Maybe you'll have time to share your opinion on the additions too.

Haha no problem.

With the internet you can stay in touch with people everywhere and you are able to find every sort of information.

=> For "every" I'd use any, but I'm not sure if "everywhere" must be substituted with anywhere or whether you can leave it the way it is.

I agree with the switiching of "every" to "any", but I would leave "everywhere", I don't think it needs changing. Either one works really.

Which one is better?

a) I can do with it what I want.

b) I can do what I want with it.

(b) sounds more natural, it is what I would say, but (a) isn't wrong, it's just not the most common way of saying that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About Youtube, Facebook, etc.: The Internet is a kind of entertainment.

=> I'd say: some kind of

First sentence of a text:

Everyone knows the problem with anorexia. Many people suffer from it.

=> the problem OF anorexia?

There is greed and there is hatred. Both is a big problem.

=> Both are a big...?

Can you say "This statistic shows..."?

=> I believe it should be "statistics show that" or "this set of statistics shows that"

Electronic home banking is simple and extremely fast, and it is no stress.

=> Is itOK? Should it be there is no stress? Or: ...and it is not stressful.

About the Internet: You can use platforms of all kind.

=> I'd say kinds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About Youtube, Facebook, etc.: The Internet is a kind of entertainment.

This is ok, but a little odd. Cf. 'The internet is entertainment of sorts' or 'the internet itself is a kind of entertainment'

=> I'd say: some kind of

Also ok, but perhaps a little odder than the first way. It sounds sarcastic to me. :blush:

Everyone knows the problem with anorexia. Many people suffer from it.

=> the problem OF anorexia?

Agreed. It's a little casual - 'everyone knows about the problem of anorexia' would be better. 'The problem with anorexia, though grammatically acceptable, implies something specific about anorexia rather than anorexia itself: 'The problem with Anorexia is: she won't do the washing up.'

There is greed and there is hatred. Both is a big problem.

=> Both are a big...?

'Are' is correct, because 'both' refers to two things. 'Either is a big problem' would be correct, because 'either' refers to one thing.

Can you say "This statistic shows..."?

=> I believe it should be "statistics show that" or "this set of statistics shows that"

I think the original is ok: you can have a singular statistic. '80% of people do not believe statistics. This statistic shows that 20% of people are gullible.'

Electronic home banking is simple and extremely fast, and it is no stress.

=> Is itOK? Should it be there is no stress? Or: ...and it is not stressful.

It's a colloquialism, and best avoided for formal written English. 'it is not stressful' would be better.

About the Internet: You can use platforms of all kind.

=> I'd say kinds.

Agreed.

I love this thread! :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this thread! :laugh:

Good to hear that from a moderator. I wasn't sure what they would think of this activity here. By the way, thanks for your help.

Time for another question:

If someone doesn't know the meaning of a word in another language, they can search it on the internet.

=> search it or search for it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Time for another question:

If someone doesn't know the meaning of a word in another language, they can search it on the internet.

=> search it or search for it?

Serch for it :classic:.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd also suggest, "He plays at Real Madrid"...

I know this is a bit old but no, I definitely don't think you could ever say that Ronaldo plays at Real Madrid without sounding extremely weird. Real Madrid is a football club (no freelancers there... at any point in time) and just like you couldn't say that Sidney Crosby plays at Pittsburgh Penguins, you can't use that preposition in this case either. A football player can only play for a certain football club. They could play in said club's hometown, or at their stadium, but they still play for the club.

Cristiano Ronaldo is currently playing football in Madrid. He regularly turns up at the Santiago Bernabeu. He plays for Real Madrid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WITH social networks like Facebook everyone is able to find former schoolmates and new friends.

Is WITH okay? Would BY or THROUGH be better? Or WITH THE HELP OF?

Downloading and listening to music IS/ARE?

Guys, I really love your help. There's no better way of analysing a language than with the help of some extremely helpful native speakers. I learn a lot from you.

Edited by legotrainfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WITH social networks like Facebook everyone is able to find former schoolmates and new friends.

Is WITH okay? Would BY or THROUGH be better? Or WITH THE HELP OF?

I wouldn't use 'with' or 'by' and indeed 'by' is probably incorrect. 'Through' and 'with the help of' are much better.

Downloading and listening to music IS/ARE?

Downloading and listening to music 'are' great activities (plural). Downloading and listening to music is illegal (where both activities are a combination and its the combination that you are going on to describe rather than something that applies to each activity separately). Another example might be drinking and driving is illegal. Its a fine line sometimes.

My two cent but hopefully the academics here will come up with further analyses.

Edited by Rick
Fixed quote tags

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My two cent but hopefully the academics here will come up with further analyses.

I notice you replied inside the quote tags and fixed that for you.

You can break up a quote as follows:

[/quote]
Your reply to the first part of the quote here.
[quote]

The first (BBcode) tag closes the first quote, whereas the second tag 're-opens' the quote again (you can see how it works by hitting 'Edit' on your own post).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She can go to street entertainments.

=> I'd say activities of street entertainment.

He hasn't seen you for just a long time.

=> Can just be put there?

The first week she was in New York she was sad.

=> In the first week in New York she was excited?

=> In the first week of being in New York she was excited?

=> The first week when she was in New York was exciting?

The weather will be in the next days as perfect as it has been.

=> The weather will be as perfect in the next few days as it has been. Possible?

=> Or, definitely correct: In the next few days the weather will be as perfect as it has been.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She can go to street entertainments.

=> I'd say activities of street entertainment.

He hasn't seen you for just a long time.

=> Can just be put there?

The first week she was in New York she was sad.

=> In the first week in New York she was excited?

=> In the first week of being in New York she was excited?

=> The first week when she was in New York was exciting?

The weather will be in the next days as perfect as it has been.

=> The weather will be as perfect in the next few days as it has been. Possible?

=> Or, definitely correct: In the next few days the weather will be as perfect as it has been.

For the first one, activities or entertainment would be better.

For the second one, just should not be there.

For the third one, "Her first week in New York was exciting." would be the best.

For the fourth one, "In the next few days the weather will be as perfect as it has been." is correct.

Edited by Sid Sidious

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Sid!

Some more things for talented analysts of errors:

The Big Ben is another sight. It is a high tower with a big clock in it.

=> Is the preposition OK?

When you're at the top of the Ferris wheel, you feel like whenyou are ill.

=> as if?

I want to tell you how life is here.

=> OK or what life is like?

It's a wonderful life in Dover.

=> It's a wonderful life that I lead in Dover.

=> Life is wonderful in Dover.

Our house is near to my job.

=> OK or workplace?

I miss you so!

=> Possible or should much be put after so?

This girl goes in my class.

=> This girl is my classmate?

=> This girl is in my class?

My sister has a big apartment in London City.

=> in the city of London?

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Sid!

Some more things for talented analysts of errors:

The Big Ben is another sight. It is a high tower with a big clock in it.

=> Is the preposition OK?

Yes it's fine (though tecnicaly Big Ben refers to the bell inside the tower alone, the tower is St Stevens tower but it's still generaly called Big Ben).

When you're at the top of the Ferris wheel, you feel like whenyou are ill.

=> as if?

A bit ill, like you are ill.

I want to tell you how life is here.

=> OK or what life is like?

What life is like here.

It's a wonderful life in Dover.

=> It's a wonderful life that I lead in Dover.

=> Life is wonderful in Dover.

It's a wonderful life in Dover or Life is wonderful in Dover.

Our house is near to my job.

=> OK or workplace?

Workplace

I miss you so!

=> Possible or should much be put after so?

So much

This girl goes in my class.

=> This girl is my classmate?

=> This girl is in my class?

This girl is in my class

My sister has a big apartment in London City.

=> in the city of London?

I would just say in London and leave out city.

Thanks in advance!

My answers in Bold :classic:.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to be slightly pedantic:

'The City of London' refers specifically to the financial district. If referring to London as a whole, it would be okay to say 'the city of London', but most people would just say '... in London.'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this is a bit old but no, I definitely don't think you could ever say that Ronaldo plays at Real Madrid without sounding extremely weird. Real Madrid is a football club (no freelancers there... at any point in time) and just like you couldn't say that Sidney Crosby plays at Pittsburgh Penguins, you can't use that preposition in this case either. A football player can only play for a certain football club. They could play in said club's hometown, or at their stadium, but they still play for the club.

Cristiano Ronaldo is currently playing football in Madrid. He regularly turns up at the Santiago Bernabeu. He plays for Real Madrid.

Ah, I was thinking it was a generic nightclub, and that the person was a musician. :blush: You learn something every day! :laugh:

Thank you Sid!

Some more things for talented analysts of errors:

The Big Ben is another sight. It is a high tower with a big clock in it.

=> Is the preposition OK?

In or on, either one is correct.

When you're at the top of the Ferris wheel, you feel like whenyou are ill.

=> as if?

Yes, or you could simply remove the "when"; "When you're at the top of the Ferris wheel, you feel like you are ill."

I want to tell you how life is here.

=> OK or what life is like?

"I want to tell you what life is like here."

It's a wonderful life in Dover.

=> It's a wonderful life that I lead in Dover.

=> Life is wonderful in Dover.

The second correction is more natural. Although, he may be referring to the movie It's a Wonderful Life, I'm not sure if it's set in Dover. :blush: If it is and that was the student's intention, then the proper expression of that would be, "It's a Wonderful Life is set in Dover." A quick Google search cleared this up for me. :blush:

Our house is near to my job.

=> OK or workplace?

It's OK, but "close" would be more natural than "near". :wink:

I miss you so!

=> Possible or should much be put after so?

Either way is correct. The original is more archaic/poetic; it's something I would have my character say in the Heroica RPG, whereas if I myself were to express this sentiment, I'd say "I miss you so much!" Might be a good chance to get him hooked on the Heroica RPG. :tongue:

This girl goes in my class.

=> This girl is my classmate?

=> This girl is in my class?

Either correction would work, but the second is more natural.

My sister has a big apartment in London City.

=> in the city of London?

Thanks in advance!

Just "London"; "My sister has a big apartment in London."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.