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Ralph_S

Sliding door design

27 posts in this topic

In a thread on Metroid's excellent four wide VW vans, he has been getting questions about the technique he used to create sliding doors.

It's a particularly nice application of an idea I've used many years and that I also keep getting questions about whenever I produce a new vehicle that uses it (which is why I decided to give it its own thread). MetroiD has managed to figure it out, but I'll post the pictures here.

The door has two little arms attached to its front, the bottom one with a 1x1 plate that sticks out below and the top one with a 1x1 tile on top.

2530826244_b8836e4db5.jpg

sliding door (3) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

The plate slides through an L-shaped groove on the bottom of the van and the tile on top slides through a matching L-shaped groove in the roof.

2530827204_117ea1cf77.jpg

sliding door (2) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

To open the door you first slide it out one stud (moving the 1x1 plate and tile along the short arm of the L).

2530012779_ba8bcb5912.jpg

sliding door by Mad physicist, on Flickr

Then you can slide the door aft.

2530011827_69d45a1ab1.jpg

sliding door (1) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

It's a little three-dimensional puzzle, but the construction is nothing particularly complicated once you've figured out how to do it! There is no fancy SNOT work. Just tiles and plate. I've been using it for years. The pictures above were of my 6-wide Courier van

2518159785_afedbc39c3.jpg

Courier van (3) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

I've also used it on several five-wide vehicles (including a Volkswagen) and this UK police van.

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Police van (3) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

The doors work best when they are fairly small. On larger vehicles it becomes easier to twist the door from its mountings. Still, with a few modifications the idea can be applied to larger doors as well. I used it for my much larger ambulance van as well, where the door gets extra support when open by a ridge (of half a stud wide) along the side of the vehicle.

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Dutch Ambulance (9) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

I've used it on several helicopters as well, including my Sea King. Here I've used a version that pops out half a stud.

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UH-3H Sea King (13) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

Cheers,

Ralph

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Thanks for this handy guide :sweet: I'll definitely try out this technique sometime.

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One particular reason why I didn't want to do the graphic explanation of this was because, at the end of the day, this was your design in this first place. Glad to see you've decided to share it - I must say I'm now looking forward to a wave of sliding door-fitted cars, vans, etc. :tongue:

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I have been thinking of doing an airplane hangar for the plane that came with the Century Skyway (4 wide), but have been stumped on how to create a sliding split door to open. This may be a good starting point for a nice look, but not overly complicated gear/technic style door, since the door will be about 12-14 studs high.

Thanks for sharing.

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Ohhhh... I see, I see said the old blind man.

Thanks for sharing "Ralph_S", I'm going to make vans now!

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Thanks 'Ralph_S' for this information, now I'm thinking of a sliding door design for some of my upcomming MOC's ! :wink:

I'm a conformist! ! :sweet:

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Thanks for your comments. they are much appreciated. I have seen many fancy ways of making sliding doors, but I'd like to think that simple ideas are often the best :sweet:

Cheers,

Ralph

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Ralph, thanks for sharing this sliding door design with us. It's great to see such building tips to be shared with the community which helps to benefit and to enhance the vehicle playability. I got to try this one day. :blush:

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You're a genius! This is something I've got to try for my Star Wars doors....

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Fantastic!! Know exactly what I'm going to use this for! Had a Eureka moment last night whilst in bed.

May take a while to do but it'll look amazing! :thumbup:

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Does the door sit flush to the side when closed?

Sorry I didn't reply to this sooner. I didn't see it sooner. Yes it does.

2518989914_16b84870a7.jpg

Courier van (1) by Mad physicist, on Flickr

I'd like to see a video of this in action.

Cheers,

Ralph

Edited by Ralph_S

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I might use this technique sometime, you are a genius default_classic.gif

Thanks. I try :laugh:

Thank you very much :) You've come up with a great idea there!

Thank you. It would be no fun if it wouldn't be flush when closed. In fact, that really was the whole point.

Cheers,

Ralph

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It's been a while since this thread had it's last message, but I have since made a video of the sliding door in action and this seemed the most suitable place to post it.

Sliding door mechanism

Cheers,

Ralph

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Great technique! Works beautifully. Thanks for the instructions and video! :thumbup:

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You're welcome guys. This sort of thing is best explained with a video.

Cheers,

Ralph

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Very nice idea! I definitely have to try this technique! Thanks! Good job! :thumbup:

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