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Superkalle

Lego report on childrens creativity in the digital age

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While surfing, I bumped into a report about "Systematic creativity in the digital age" from Lego Learning Institute (I have no idea what that is).

Strangely, they don't even mention LDD, even though as there is a chapter called "Connecting the Virtual and Physical Realms", in which I think LDD is one of the best examples there is.

Download here (pdf)

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Boy, this is pretty deep stuff. Somebody may have earned their Masters Degree thesis with this! I like how they say (in Chapter 2):

"‘Geeking out’ involves an intense commitment to or engagement with media or technology, often one particular media property, genre, or type of technology. It involves learning to navigate esoteric domains of knowledge and practice and participating in communities that traffic in these forms of expertise. It is a mode of learning that is peer-driven, but focused on gaining deep knowledge and expertise in specific areas of interest. Ongoing access to digital media is a requirement of ‘geeking out’. Often, however, such access is just part of what makes participation possible."

Funny, I thought that we Eurobricks LDD users were "dweebs" or "dorks", but certainly not "geeks"! :wink:

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I'm doing my master thesis on related subjects and am also working on a LEGO empowered learning environment, so quite handy to use! Thanks a lot.

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Boy, this is pretty deep stuff. Somebody may have earned their Masters Degree thesis with this! I like how they say (in Chapter 2):

"‘Geeking out’ involves an intense commitment to or engagement with media or technology, often one particular media property, genre, or type of technology. It involves learning to navigate esoteric domains of knowledge and practice and participating in communities that traffic in these forms of expertise. It is a mode of learning that is peer-driven, but focused on gaining deep knowledge and expertise in specific areas of interest. Ongoing access to digital media is a requirement of ‘geeking out’. Often, however, such access is just part of what makes participation possible."

Funny, I thought that we Eurobricks LDD users were "dweebs" or "dorks", but certainly not "geeks"! :wink:

Well, it is deep and very interesting. But it is a typical corporation sponsored research. The conclusion is almost an advert :) (I mean, take a look at page 84). Not like I disagree with the conclusion, but still: I don't think it was meant to earn anyone's masters but just to show how LEGO fits in this new world and why should parents be buying more of it (and they should).

Regarding LDD, I wonder how many kids actually use it. I will not put in doubt that many are probably perfectly capable of doing so but as far as a 'toy' LDD doesn't have the physical part that would attract kids to LEGO or the interactive part that would make them want to play video games. So really, does anyone know how strongis LDD doing with kids? It always seemed like AFOL-service to me:)

Edited by vexorian

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The Lego Learning Institute is a foundation which is independant of Lego, but part of the overall structure.

Lego Learning Institute

To quote from a recent advert

The LEGO Learning Institute (LLI) is a part of the Consumer Insight & Experience Innovation department. The purpose of LLI is to supplement consumer insight with academic research, building foundational and scientific insight into the consumer experience. Furthermore, we assist the various LEGO businesses in developing products, services, and experiences firmly rooted in the LEGO idea of systematic creativity.

It seems to be aimed at bridging corporate research and academic research projects. There are always ethical problems when a big company sponsors (clinical) research for its products, and independence is the key, as is the freedom of the research team to publish any results - either good or bad (this does happpen from time to time).

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Thanks for posting this Superkalle,

I found chapters 1, 2 and 7 well worth reading, especially chapter 2, which is about how and why people communicate on Web 2.0. The paper has very broad applicatons, but is also very specific. I guess we can get some idea of how TLG is thinking about Lego Universe, Mindstorms, and LDD from this. It's funny how we all take for granted, that the stuff that kids can access at home is a lot more sophisticated than many people can use in the workplace.

Robuko

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