Superkalle

LDD Design Challenge #1

8 posts in this topic

EarthLDD2.jpg

Hi folks,

OK, here's a challenge for you. Look at the earth...so beautiful to behold in space. But...there's something terribly wrong with our dear planet. Here's the challenge:

1) What's the major flaw in this LDD model?

2) How can you easily find this type of flaw (which method/tool do you use)?

3) How would you go about fixing the problem in this particular model?

Download the LXF below and start you investigation. Post your proposals and ideas here. And sorry: There is no price for this one - just the glory.

IMPORTANT: If any of you LDD geeks out there have any nasty design challenges to share, either post it as a new thread, or PM me and I can make an LDD challenge out of it (naturally with credit to you!)

PS: This beautiful model was not done by me. If I recall correctly I downloaded it from the old Factory LDD gallery site, and now I can't find the original maker. If you who made it see this, please contact me, and I will make sure you get due credit.

Earth1.zip

Edited by Superkalle

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Sure there is a price to this challange superkalle!

Let me dig in my stuff at home and lets see what I can come up with.

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My Suggestion

1. Not all pices is connected.

2. Choose "Connected Selection tool" and click somewhere on the globe on for example africa . Then drag the selection away from the rest of the pieces to see which ones are left behind.

3. Add more internal pieces. Perhaps by coloring the not connected ones in another colour so that it is possible to see them and then use the "Hide tool" to bee able to place the internel pieces.

(I can solve it later but not now since I am officially working...) Ok, so much for working. But it is a quick fix so I would not try to build it in this state. It would be best to have some extra parts to add where appropriate.

Are there any more errors in the file???

Earth1.zip

Edited by Anders Nolberger

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The only error i see are floating bricks, but thta can be fixed easily with an internal structure. Oh and there is only desert, no forrests :D

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Well, well....I guess that was easy then, because you're all absolutetly right. And thanks Anders for putting the answers so clearly.

My main point was - use the connected tool when you're done with your design - It's a good way to see if you models holds together:

ConnectedTool.jpg

For me this challange highlights one of the biggest problems with digital Lego design - the fact that you can't "feel" how your creation holds together.

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For me this challange highlights one of the biggest problems with digital Lego design - the fact that you can't "feel" how your creation holds together.

I agree! You can somewhat predict how it holds but you aren't exactly sure.

I usually build in LDD when I get bored, once I made something that I would like to build with real bricks but it ended up very fragile :s to bad you more or less have to start all over at that point.

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I agree! You can somewhat predict how it holds but you aren't exactly sure.

I usually build in LDD when I get bored, once I made something that I would like to build with real bricks but it ended up very fragile :s to bad you more or less have to start all over at that point.

I use LDD to create an outline, or mock-up of the model. Then I test build with physical bricks to see how it holds together and how joints line up. Then I update the LDD model and after that I'm ready to build the final model. I guess it depends on which type of models you make, but I never have to start from scratch again.

I find LDD superior when playing around with design ideas and trying to figure out clever ways to use bricks - specially since you can have parts "Hanging in the air" until you get the whole thing together. But personally I'm very strict on also building the models with ABS. Building purely digital has it's charm, but it's the physical models that give that ultimate satisfaction.

Just my 5 cents as always...

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If you use the connected tool and click the major part of your model, you can then press the hide tool. Only loose pieces will still be shown.

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