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Tereglith

MOC: "Quoth the raven, 'nevermore'."

8 posts in this topic

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This MOC is based on Edgar Allen Poe's classic poem, "The Raven", first published in 1845, which is arguably the most well known poem of the 19th century. You can read the complete text here. There are a couple of things I would do to improve it if I could (namely, finding the appropriate black brick to fix the raven, making the brown more consistent, and completely re-doing the roof), but as it's for a project that comes with a deadline, I won't be able to.

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A good overall view of the scene. You can see the raven on the "pallid bust of Pallas", as well as the fireplace with "seperate dying embers". The husband of the late Lenore (in his groovy blue PJ's) has abandoned his study of "quaint and curious volumes of forgotten lore" in favor of going crazy because there's a talking bird on his door. (apologies for the lack of velvet violet lining, I settled for maroon on the chair)

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This side of the room. It looks the worst, as it was completed last.

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I like this side of the room much better. The bookshelf turned out rather well, I think.

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Creative cape usage. It's what's for dinner. Anybody got any idea where I got those purple capes? I've got nothin'.

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The worst part of this MOC is the exterior. Ah, well, dark green plants are pretty to look at. The chimney is the sad evidence that I had to tear down my Winter Toy shop for parts :cry_sad:

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The bottom half, mainly so you can see the fireplace with "each seperate dying ember" better.

Thanks for reading!

Edited by Rufus
Indexed

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It looks good, I love the idea of building off the poem. Everything looks good except the roof, but you did mentioned you wanted to redo that. I beleive the purple capes came off of Dumbledor.

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From your pics the cape look more Violet-ish than purple, so they most likely come from the Harry Potter minifig himself in certain sets. That color was used as his invisibility cloak.

Overall, nice scene, though I do agree that the roof right now looks far too flat and blocky. The different brown colors also do not mix well, so if you can fix those, it would look a lot better.

Is the raven standing on a stand, or is that white thing part of it? I like your use of the new tooth piece for wings, but the white part underneath is confusing to me.

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Very well done transversing the poem into Lego, excellent ! :classic:

I am more familar with the works of Banjo Patterson and Henry Lawson, being an Australian myself.

I did enjoy reading the poem and of course looking at your MOC in wonder ! :classic:

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Is the raven standing on a stand, or is that white thing part of it? I like your use of the new tooth piece for wings, but the white part underneath is confusing to me.

I believe it is the Bust of Pallas from the poem.

Great job with this Tereglith. :thumbup: It's always been one of my favorite poems, and I really like the way you've brought it to life. I personally love some of the details you've included like the bookshelf, feather pen on the desk, dying embers, and cute little chair. I don't think the exterior looks too bad either. As it's been said before, the roof is an important part to address.

Another minor thing that I think would really benefit this is to make it bigger. Right now, it feels a little bit cramped. When reading the title, I imagined a study more like the size of the one from this Simpsons parody.

But overall, a good job.

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Nice interpretation but I wish the room was larger, I've seen a few versions of this poem put to life and usually they are bigger. Still well done though, I like the colors and the angle of the shot in number 2

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Very cool. I like the size of the room. Very cramped and claustrophobic. The minifig himself feels a little jarring, though; the head seems too comical for the tone, and the simple blue torso feels a little anachronistic. I was thinking Henry Jones' outfit from the Indy sets could look like a classical nightgown from the right angles. Otherwise, very cool.

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Thanks for all your feedback, everyone!

It looks good, I love the idea of building off the poem. Everything looks good except the roof, but you did mentioned you wanted to redo that. I beleive the purple capes came off of Dumbledore.

Nope, I found him too, but I judged his cape to be too warm a purple to match the big piece very well.

From your pics the cape look more Violet-ish than purple, so they most likely come from the Harry Potter minifig himself in certain sets. That color was used as his invisibility cloak.

Overall, nice scene, though I do agree that the roof right now looks far too flat and blocky. The different brown colors also do not mix well, so if you can fix those, it would look a lot better.

Is the raven standing on a stand, or is that white thing part of it? I like your use of the new tooth piece for wings, but the white part underneath is confusing to me.

That ought to explain it. I bought who knows how many Harry Potter sets back in the day :grin: .

As I said, I would like to make the brown more uniform, but there are certain pieces (like the 1x2x3 inverse slopes by the fireplace) that I have only in dark brown, and others that I just ran out of regular brown.

Very well done transversing the poem into Lego, excellent ! :classic:

I am more familar with the works of Banjo Patterson and Henry Lawson, being an Australian myself.

I did enjoy reading the poem and of course looking at your MOC in wonder ! :classic:

Thanks!

I believe it is the Bust of Pallas from the poem.

Great job with this Tereglith. :thumbup: It's always been one of my favorite poems, and I really like the way you've brought it to life. I personally love some of the details you've included like the bookshelf, feather pen on the desk, dying embers, and cute little chair. I don't think the exterior looks too bad either. As it's been said before, the roof is an important part to address.

Another minor thing that I think would really benefit this is to make it bigger. Right now, it feels a little bit cramped. When reading the title, I imagined a study more like the size of the one from this Simpsons parody.

But overall, a good job.

A+ for you, it is the mentioned bust of Pallas Athene, :thumbup: . As for the size, I don't think that many average houses of the era had room for studies quite as big as the video, but I would have made it a couple studs longer with the proper pieces.

Nice interpretation but I wish the room was larger, I've seen a few versions of this poem put to life and usually they are bigger. Still well done though, I like the colors and the angle of the shot in number 2

I would've made it a couple studs longer with enough brown :sceptic: . The second picture I took from that angle randomly because I was fed up trying to photograph the raven straight on :laugh:

Very cool. I like the size of the room. Very cramped and claustrophobic. The minifig himself feels a little jarring, though; the head seems too comical for the tone, and the simple blue torso feels a little anachronistic. I was thinking Henry Jones' outfit from the Indy sets could look like a classical nightgown from the right angles. Otherwise, very cool.

Oddly enough, I also thought of giving him tan jammies with Henry Jones Sr.'s torso, but I couldn't find my Henry Jones figure! So I just stuck with the blue. Most illustrations portray a single-colored nightgown anyway. The head is actually just a place holder, I hope to locate my "perrenially desperate" head before the week is out.

Thanks again for all of your compliments!

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